Growth through energy rehabilitation

Vækst via Energirenovering

The energy consumption of private home owners is a major stepping stone on the way to a low carbon society. Figures from the Danish Building Research Institute (SBI) show that the country’s homeowners could be saving an average of one-third of their heat consumption. But homeowners are hesitant. Energy renovations are expensive, complicated and time consuming, according to homeowners questions for the Bolius Homeowner Analysis 2014. This means that many homeowners need a push in the right direction.

Therefore, the project Growth Through Energy Renovation is promoting growth in the energy renovation of private dwellings by:

  • motivating homeowners to demand and implement energy renovation and advice
  • improving industry skills and knowledge of energy renovation
  • providing tools for local initiatives for citizens

The project is funded by the Capital Region of Denmark and supports the region’s vision to become the most climate-friendly and energy-efficient region in Denmark.

The ambition of the project is for as many metropolitan municipalities to participate as possible, so knowledge sharing and learning can take place across municipal boundaries. The goal is long-term growth, increased energy savings in private housing, as well as more economical options and better housing for citizens. This creates value for private players in the construction industry, and also for citizens and municipalities.

 

FACTS

Partners

The Capital Region of Denmark (project leadership), Gate 21 (project management), Høje-Taastrup and Fredensborg Municipalities (frontrunner municipalities), Egedal, Furesø, Albertslund and Ballerup Municipalities (following municipalities). The project is open to all municipalities in the region.

Funding

The total budget amounts to 5.643 million Danish kroner, of which the Capital Region has supported the project with 2.675 million kroner.

Duration

January 2015 – December 2016

Project management

Gate 21

More information

Signe Poulsen, project leader Buildings & Cities